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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
in england. you present yourself as a secular muslim. but one trying to understand the religion and your role in it. >> i mean i grew up in a family in which there was very little religion. my father wasn't religious at all. but he was really interested in the subject of, you know, the birth and growth of islam. he basically transmitted that interest to me. so when i studied history at cambridge, i did a special subject in that exactly. while i was studying it was where i came across the so-called incident of the satanic verses. >> brown: you say in the book you noted good story. >> 20 years later i find out how good a story it was. >> brown: you wrote when you finished the satanic verses you thought it was the least political of the novels you had written at the time. you were genuinely surprised at what had happened. >> i thought i was very respectful about islam. yes from a secular point of view but it talks about the birth of this religion and i thought it was pretty admiring of the person at the center of it, the prophet of islam. >> brown: what did you think you were doing? what did you
the talibaned the name of religion. we have seen a reasonable amount of change this time around. because malala is a young girl, because she is a teenager and a symbol against the battle of the taliban, political leaders have come out, they have spoken out against this with unequivocal condemnation this time. remember that the terrorists and these right-wing groups are a very small majority of the 180 million people living here in pakistan. >> woodruff: we also know that today pakistan's top military official, the chief of army staff general khani, went to visit her in the hospital. how significant is that? >> reporter: that's significant on a number of level, because, of course, the military has not been able to leave the swat valley. they still have a considerable presence, alongside the civilian administration, and the police there, to keep it protected to ensure that the taliban do not return to that area. and, of course, malala's in the civil military hospital where she's being cared for and operated on last night. general cahani's statement in particular is of interest, because of what i
values in regard to the family, to religion. >> abortion. >> abortion. issues on that. >> gay marriage. they're very conservative. that's basically what changed everything. i remember reading an article where president bush was asked what was one of his biggest regrets. he said, not passing immigration reform. as a republican and having a republican congress he could not convince his own party to support immigration reform. we focus only on the undocumented immigrants. i think that that's -- that that's what's happening, that when people perceive latinos, first thing that pops into their mind is immigrants and undocumented immigrants or like they say illegal aliens which is a term we don't like to use. they don't realize that 74% are americans, are citizens either by birth or naturalized. so the majority of latinos are americans and we have a buying power of over a trillion dollars. if latinos in the u.s. were a country, we would be the 14th largest economy in the world. they're 2.5 billion businesses that are latino owned. we are a very important part of this country. we contribute ve
americans consider themselves to be protestant. that's according to a new pew study on religion in the u.s. protestants historically made up a majority of the country. now, they account for 48% of the population. and one-fifth of adults in the survey had no religious affiliation. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: a new congressional report takes aim at two chinese telecommunications giants. jeffrey brown reports. these are the second and fifth largest makers of wireless telecommunication gear in the world. they're looking to expand their limited sales in the u.s. but in a 52-page report, the house intelligence committee warned monday against doing business with the chinese companies, citing concerns over corporate speen, cyber war risks and more. committee chair mike rogers. >> the investigation concluded that the risks associated with these companies providing equipment and services to u.s. critical infrastructure undermines the core u.s. national security interests. as a majority of u.s. networks are run by private companies, we recommend that priv
for ivory isn't limited to one religion. in asia, groups of christians, buddhists and muslims all covet it. "national geographic's" two-year investigation revealed that governments are often complicit in the purchasing and processing of ivory. the magazine also found that ivory traffickers are operating with impunity, thwarting poorly written international laws and ineffective organizations designed to clamp down on the illegal trade. in countries where corruption is widespread, ivory that is seized by the authorities, often disappears. in 2006 a government storeroom in thailand, like this one in bangkok, was raided, and the tusks replaced with plastic replicas. meanwhile, in 2011 more elephants were poached than in any year since a global ban on ivory trading was passed in 1989. they were killed for their tusks and tusks alone. the reporter on the story, brian christie, joins us now, thanks for being with us. pleasure being here, hari. >> sreenivasan: didn't the planet say ivory trade was illegal back in 1990? >> it did. it did. and as soon as it did elephant populations began to recover.
religion or sexual orientation or how much money you have. and so, that is really about, you know, equal protection under the law. and we all want to see that in place. we want our judges and our justices to base their decisions on, you know, the constitutional law. and that's what they did. >> they said in effect -- >> that the government cannot deny rights to people based upon, you know, characteristics. >> including the right to choose your marriage partner. >> including the right to love whom you want and have a civil contract that gives you a lot of rights under our state laws. >> and they specifically, in that decision, said, "this is," as sally said, "a civil right. we are not talking about what churches can decide to do, whether they want to marry people or not. that's a decision, a religious decision for them." >> in fact, they reaffirmed religious liberty. they reaffirmed the right in the decision that churches you know, if this is not part of their belief and part of their creed, they have the very right not to do this. this is about our government and about, you know, civil l
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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